Tag Archives: Design

Ben Lane

Face to Face

11.06.2013 by Ben Lane

In an age when office mates bridge the 10 foot communication chasm between their desks with email and text messages, Key Tech actively recruits engineers and designers that enjoy and excel at the lost art of face-to-face communication.

Andre Minoli

3D Printed Revolution

09.19.2013 by Andre Minoli

It’s the year 2013, we survived the Mayan apocalypse, and if you’re keeping count, we’re supposed to have hover-boards and flying-cars in 2 years – at least according to Back to the Future Part II. I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but I don’t think that one is going to happen soon. But I have better news; we’re developing something far more exciting and unimaginably limitless — a replicator straight out of Star Trek! I’m talking about 3D printers: devices and services which allow you to design and build your own products, craft experiences catered specifically to meet your design needs, and make your ideas directly from your home without ever having to stock parts. The third industrial revolution is here and it’s something to get really excited about.

Jenny Regan

Key Tech at AACC in Houston July 30-Aug 1, 2013

07.18.2013 by Jenny Regan

For Key Tech, the action at AACC is on the expo floor just as much as the conference sessions. The business of diagnostics relies on orchestration of new assay science and instrument platforms, and we’re the instrument platform team.

Abbie Shoemaker

Flexible PCB Design Considerations

05.22.2013 by Abbie Shoemaker

Flexible circuits are all around us – in cell phones, cameras, and laptops – and also in us – in pacemakers, cochlear implants, and defibrillators. Over the years, as devices have become smaller and wearable and implantable medical devices have become more prevalent, the flex circuit industry has boomed. Key Tech has also been involved in this trend. We’ve designed a number of flex and rigid-flex PCBs for various applications, and along the way we’ve picked up a few tips.

Eric Schneider

Working with Complicated Disposable to Instrument Interfaces

04.25.2013 by Eric Schneider

Lab on a Chip, Microfluidics, and Sample to Answer are terms we hear a lot when designing medical devices. For years the trend has been to integrate more and more laboratory functions into small disposable chips or cartridges with the ideal goal of being able to perform all the functions from sample preparation to detection in a single disposable on one instrument. This has led the instruments disposable interfaces to be increasingly complex. Sometimes there are hundreds of electrical connections for internal sensors or actuators, multiple heaters for PCR amplification, systems for magnetic bead capture, pressure connections for fluid control, actuators for dispensing stored fluids, and external sensors just to name a few. The complex interfaces required can cause many design challenges, but after working on several of these types of projects over the years we’ve learned there are some ways you can make your life easier, and end up with a better design.

Abbie Shoemaker

Betascape 2012

10.03.2012 by Abbie Shoemaker

2012 marked the third year of Betascape, the annual weekend gathering of artists and technologists (some may say nerds) from the Baltimore area to explore the intersection of their disciplines.

Chet Larrow

TED Talks: Designing for the Real World

09.12.2012 by Chet Larrow

TED Talks over the last couple of years has published many inspiring and informational pieces and has become a staple for those working in creative industries. The relevance of the one floating around the KeyTech office this past week was no exception.

Alex Flamm

IDSA Annual Report

08.22.2012 by Alex Flamm

The Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA) just held their annual international conference in Boston, MA. Jeremy Savage and I attended the 4-day event and had the pleasure of listening to some great presentations, ranging from the informative to the inspirational.

Ben Lane

Engineering the Crab Feast

08.01.2012 by Ben Lane

Early in July, Key Tech hosted our annual crab feast on a farm north of Baltimore. This event started more than a decade ago when the company had less than 10 employees, and now hosts nearly 100 employees (current, past, and future), family, friends, clients, and vendors.

Aaron Pearl

Welcoming a New Generation of 3D Printers

06.06.2012 by Aaron Pearl

Here at Key Tech, we often use physical prototypes in our design process to literally get a feel for the part. While 3D computer models can be helpful, there is simply no substitute for actually holding a part in your hands and feeling it. 3D printing is often a great option for an initial prototype, especially for complex parts that are difficult to machine. Essentially, 3D printers work by printing many thin 2D cross-sections of a part on top of each other, bonding each layer to the previous one as they go. For more complex parts, special support structures may be required to keep the part from falling apart during the printing process, but the process is essentially the same.